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Ten things you may not realise you can do with macadamias

Ten things you may not realise you can do with macadamias



15 October 2018
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Macadamia nuts are not only delicious, they are also extremely versatile. They are a nut that can be incorporated into a number of dishes, both sweet and savoury, and also used in the bathroom, the bedroom and behind the bar. 

Here’s 10 suggestions to make the most of your macadamias:

1. Freeze them

The healthy oils in macadamias can spoil if the nuts are not stored properly. They keep for up to three months in an airtight container in the refrigerator. However, you may not know that they can also be frozen. Storing them in the freezer will keep them fresh for three to six months.

2. Use macadamia nuts as a dairy substitute 

We all know that macadamias are delicious by themselves, but did you know that they can also play an important role in a plant-based diet? From sour cream and ice-cream to cheese and butter, the high healthy-fat content in macadamias means they can be made into delicious plant-based dairy alternatives. Here are our favourite recipes to help you go dairy-free with macadamias.

Homemade macadamia 'cheese' dairy free
Homemade macadamia 'cheese' is dairy free

3. Pamper your skin

Macadamia nut oil is lightweight and easy for the skin to absorb, making it an incredibly nourishing, natural moisturiser for dry skin. It also has proven benefits for mature skin. Macadamia oil is a luxury ingredient at many top spas, but it is also easy to make your own homemade beauty products with this oil. A macadamia and citrus body scrub is easy to make and smells divine, and you can also massage the oil straight into your hands and cuticles for an express, at-home manicure!

4. Nourish your hair

Macadamia oil is not only nourishing for your skin, it is also a luxury treatment for your hair. Several leading hair care brands have launched products featuring the nourishing properties of macadamia oil but you don’t need to splash out on fancy products to enjoy the benefits. You can try your own macadamia oil scalp massage at home.

5. Drink them

The velvety crunch of macadamias translates into a full and flavoursome nut milk. Macadamias don’t require soaking in the way some nuts do, so it’s simple to make macadamia milk at home. Use it for chai lattes in winter and summer smoothies when the weather is warmer.

Macadamia nuts in their shell and green husk
Macadamia nuts in their shell and green husk

6. Make amazing things with the shells

Macadamias are known as tough nuts to crack, literally. But that’s also what makes the shells so valuable. Although they have been reused on farms as a compost for decades, in recent years the shells have begun to be used in everything from green electricity to high-end homewares. And the research continues. Here’s how they are being used at the moment.

7. Barbeque them 

Standing around the barbeque snacking from a bowl of crunchy macadamias is something that every Australian knows how to do. But did you know that you can actually barbeque the macadamias themselves? This recipe for muddled macadamias on the BBQ shows you how.

8. Make cocktails

Macadamias have been a popular bar snack for some time, but they now are growing in popularity behind the bar too! Cape Byron Distillery uses native botanicals including macadamia, finger limes, aniseed myrtle, cinnamon myrtle and native raspberry in its award-winning Brookie’s Dry Gin. Perfect for your G and T. For a more tropical feeling, try a macadamia-style Pina Coloda or mix some macadamia nut liqueur into your next cocktail concoction.

Macadamia cocktails
Macadamia cocktails

9. Get romantic

Many masseurs prefer to use macadamia oil as a base oil for their work. Not only is it non-greasy, it also emits a beautiful nutty aroma when warmed. It is easy to use as a massage oil at home too. Whether you want the vibe to be relaxing or romantic, simply add a drop or two of your favourite essential oil to the macadamia oil base. Lavender helps with relaxation while ylang ylang is a known aphrodisiac. Combine them and who knows what might happen!

10. Butter substitute

Macadamia oil boasts a wonderfully smooth, buttery flavour, and is great for roasting, baking and deep-frying. But did you know it can also be used as a substitute for butter when baking? The advice is to substitute at a 3-to-4 ratio, if the recipe says one cup of butter, replace it with 3/4 of a cup of macadamia oil.

What’s the unusual way macadamias feature in your day? Let us know on our Facebook page!


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